Political liberalism and political compliance: Part 2 of the problem of political compliance in rawls’s theories of justice

Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):135-157 (2006)
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Abstract

Three interlocking features appear to underpin Rawls’s justification of political compliance within the context of political liberalism: namely, a specific territory; a specific society; and a specific conception of what it is to be reasonable. When any one feature is subject to critical examination, while presupposing that the other two are acceptable, Rawls’s argument for political compliance may seem persuasive. But when all three features are critically examined together, his justification of political compliance within political liberalism can be seen to lack cogency. Thus, political compliance fails to be justified by a free-standing political liberalism. Key Words: philosophical anarchism • political duties • political liberalism • political obligation • Rawls.

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Citations of this work

Coercive redistribution and public agreement: re‐evaluating the libertarian challenge of charity.Clare Chambers & Philip Parvin - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):93-114.

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References found in this work

Justice as fairness: Political not metaphysical.John Rawls - 1985 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 14 (3):223-251.
The Law of Peoples.John Rawls - 1993 - Critical Inquiry 20 (1):36-68.
The Law of Peoples.John Rawls - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):246-253.
Justice as fairness.John Rawls - 1958 - Philosophical Review 67 (2):164-194.
Justice as Fairness.John Rawls - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press.

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