Consciousness and Cognition 70:57-69 (2019)

Authors
Abstract
Coffee and tea are two beverages commonly-consumed around the world. Therefore, there is much research regarding their physiological effects. However, less is known about their psychological meanings. Derived from a predicted lay association between coffee and arousal, we posit that exposure to coffee-related cues should increase arousal, even in the absence of actual ingestion, relative to exposure to tea-related cues. We further suggest that higher arousal levels should facilitate a concrete level of mental construal as conceptualized by Construal Level Theory. In four experiments, we find that coffee cues prompted participants to see temporal distances as shorter and to think in more concrete, precise terms. Both subjective and physiological arousal explain the effects. We situate our work in the literature that connects food and beverage to cognition or decision-making. We also discuss the applied relevance of our results as coffee and tea are among the most prevalent beverages globally.
Keywords coffee and tea  food and beverage  arousal  cognition  construals
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1016/j.concog.2019.02.007
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Upload history
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Insomnia and the Attribution Process.Michael D. Storms & Richard E. Nisbett - 1970 - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 16 (2):319-328.
The Relationship of Performance Level to Level of Arousal.Richard G. Stennett - 1957 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (1):54.
Use of Cues in the Visual Periphery Under Conditions of Arousal.Donna M. Cornsweet - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):14.
Arousal, Adaptation Level, and Accentuation of Judgment.Wolfgang Schönpflug - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (3):443.
Tachistoscopic Recognition Thresholds as a Function of Arousal Level.Gary W. Patton - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):354.
An Explanation of Resisted Discoveries Based on Construal-Level Theory.Hui Fang - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (1):41-50.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2019-03-06

Total views
127 ( #70,241 of 2,333,191 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
63 ( #8,540 of 2,333,191 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes