Moral autonomy, civil liberties, and confucianism

Philosophy East and West 52 (3):281-310 (2002)

Authors
Abstract
Three claims are defended. (1) There is a conception of moral autonomy in Confucian ethics that to a degree can support toleration and freedom. However, (2) Confucian moral autonomy is different from personal autonomy, and the latter gives a stronger justification for civil and personal liberties than does the former. (3) The contemporary appeal of Confucianism would be strengthened by including personal autonomy, and this need not be seen as forsaking Confucian ethics but rather as an internal revision in response to new social circumstances. From this inclusion emerges a new theory of liberties that recognizes the value of personal autonomy and the importance of the ethical good that liberties instrumentally serve to promote
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1353/pew.2002.0012
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 45,305
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Democracy in Confucianism.Sor-Hoon Tan - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (5):293-303.
A Confucian Conception of Critical Thinking.Charlene Tan - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):331-343.
A Confucian Conception of Critical Thinking.Charlene Tan - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4).

View all 15 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
479 ( #10,029 of 2,279,929 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
14 ( #57,544 of 2,279,929 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes

Sign in to use this feature