Why do individuals with autism lack the motivation or capacity to share intentions?

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):695-696 (2005)

Abstract

Tomasello et al. highlight how in combination cognitive impairments and affective impairments help explain why individuals with autism do not enter fully into human culture. We query whether the motivational component is a later development in human ontogeny and whether the cognitive level of intention reading is intact in autism. A key question is what neuropsychological impairments underlie this cognitive–affective impairment.

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