Endurance and non-endurance: From the perspective of virtue ethics [Book Review]

Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (3):335-351 (2008)
Abstract
By analysing the two relevant psychological phenomena of “endurance” and “non-endurance,” this essay aims to reveal the ethical implications of a Confucian approach, namely regarding non-endurance as an impulse of primary virtue. Based on this case study, the author then explores the significance of moral cultivation or psychological training in establishing moral personality and the complexities of such a process. Meanwhile, “love” in Confucian ethics means sympathy for the inferior rather than affection for the revered. Hopefully, this study may deepen our understanding of virtue ethics.
Keywords endurance  non-endurance  love  morality  Confucian ethics    不忍    德性  儒家伦理
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DOI 10.1007/s11466-008-0022-x
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