Journal of Value Inquiry 54 (3):371-386 (2020)

Authors
Eugene Chislenko
Temple University
Abstract
T.M. Scanlon has recently offered an influential treatment of blame as a response to the impairment of a relationship. I argue, first, that Scanlon’s remarks about the nature of blame suggest several sharply diverging views, so different that they can reasonably be considered different theories: a judgment-centered theory, on which blame is the reaction the blamer judges appropriate; an appropriateness-centered theory, on which blame is any reaction that is actually appropriate; and a substantive list theory, on which blame is any of a list of reactions, such as anger or loss of trust. Once distinguished, each theory faces a series of formidable challenges that neither Scanlon nor his commentators have addressed. I argue that the notion of directed attention, central in Scanlon’s earlier work, can be used to address these challenges, while preserving the spirit of Scanlon’s discussion of blame.
Keywords Blame  T.M. Scanlon  Attention  blameworthiness  judgment  appropriateness  moral evaluation
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DOI 10.1007/s10790-019-09703-7
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References found in this work BETA

The Significance of Choice.T. M. Scanlon - 1988 - In Sterling M. McMurrin (ed.), The Tanner Lectures on Human Values (Vol. 8, pp. 149-216). University of Utah Press.
Précis of Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. [REVIEW]T. Scanlon - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (2):459-463.
Reply to Hill, Mason and Wedgwood. [REVIEW]T. Scanlon - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (2):490-505.

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