In John Bickle (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press (2009)

Authors
Mazviita Chirimuuta
University of Pittsburgh
Ian Gold
McGill University
Abstract
The concept of the receptive field, first articulated by Hartline, is central to visual neuroscience. The receptive field of a neuron encompasses the spatial and temporal properties of stimuli that activate the neuron, and, as Hubel and Wiesel conceived of it, a neuron’s receptive field is static. This makes it possible to build models of neural circuits and to build up more complex receptive fields out of simpler ones. Recent work in visual neurophysiology is providing evidence that the classical receptive field is an inaccurate picture. The receptive field seems to be a dynamic feature of the neuron. In particular, the receptive field of neurons in V1 seems to be dependent on the properties of the stimulus. In this paper, we review the history of the concept of the receptive field and the problematic data. We then consider a number of possible theoretical responses to these data.
Keywords philosophy of perception  philosophy of mind  neurophilosophy  philosophy of neuroscience  philosophy of cognitive science  vision
Categories (categorize this paper)
Buy the book Find it on Amazon.com
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Other versions
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

The Dialectical Biologist.Philip Kitcher, Richard Levins & Richard Lewontin - 1989 - Philosophical Review 98 (2):262.
Molyneux's Question.Gareth Evans - 1985 - In Collected Papers. Oxford University Press.
Ways of Coloring.Evan Thompson, A. Palacios & F. J. Varela - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):1-26.

View all 11 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Extending, Changing, and Explaining the Brain.Mazviita Chirimuuta - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):613-638.

View all 6 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2010-02-15

Total views
981 ( #4,971 of 2,439,004 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
40 ( #18,359 of 2,439,004 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes