The failure to give: Reducing barriers to organ donation


Abstract
: Moral frameworks for evaluating non-donation strategies to increase the supply of cadaveric human organs for transplantation and ways to overcome barriers to organ donation are explored. Organ transplantation is a very complex area, because the human body evokes various beliefs, symbols, sentiments, and emotions as well as various rituals and social practices. From a rationalistic standpoint, some policies to increase the supply of transplantable organs may appear to be quite defensible but then turn out to be ineffective and perhaps even counterproductive because of inadequate attention to these rich and complex features of human body parts. Excessively rationalistic policies neglect deep beliefs, symbols, sentiments, and emotions and the like, and that deficiency marks many actual and proposed policies. In addition, policies are often too individualistic and too legalistic
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DOI 10.1353/ken.2001.0001
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Individual and Family Decisions About Organ Donation.T. M. Wilkinson - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):26–40.
Imminent Death Donation: Ethical and Practical Policy Considerations.Jordan Potter - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (2):524-537.

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