Journal of Moral Philosophy 16 (4):486-508 (2019)

Authors
Michael Cholbi
University of Edinburgh
Abstract
Should we regret the fact that we are often more emotionally resilient in response to the deaths of our loved ones than we might expect -- that the suffering associated with grief often dissipates more quickly and more fully than we anticipate? Dan Moller ("Love and Death") argues that we should, because this resilience epistemically severs us from our loved ones and thereby "deprives us of insight into our own condition." I argue that Moller's conclusion is correct despite resting on a mistaken picture of the nature and significance of grief. Unlike Moller, I contend that grief is a composite emotional process, rather than a single mental state; that grief is a species of emotional attention rather than perception; and that grief is a form of activity directed at placing our relationships with the deceased on new terms. It is precisely because grief has these three features that it facilitates the scrutiny of our practical identities and thus fosters self-knowledge and self-understanding.
Keywords grief  regret  self-knowledge
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Reprint years 2019
DOI 10.1163/17455243-20180015
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References found in this work BETA

Grief and Recovery.Ryan Preston-Roedder & Erica Preston-Roedder - 2017 - In Anna Gotlib (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Sadness. London: Rowman & Littlefield International.
Grief: A Narrative Account.Peter Goldie - 2011 - Ratio 24 (2):119-137.
Finding the Good in Grief: What Augustine Knew but Meursault Couldn't.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (1):91-105.
Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 1912 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 74:539.

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