The Seat of Sovereignty: Hobbes on the Artificial Person of the Commonwealth or State

Hobbes Studies 25 (2):123-142 (2012)
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Abstract

Is sovereignty in Hobbes the power of a person or of an office? This article defends the thesis that it is the latter. The interpretation is based on an analysis of Hobbes’s version of the social contract in Leviathan . Pace Quentin Skinner, it will be argued that the person whom Hobbes calls “sovereign” is not a person but the office of government

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Christine Chwaszcza
University of Cologne

Citations of this work

Hobbes and Prosopopoeia.Jerónimo Rilla - 2022 - Intellectual History Review 32 (2):259-280.
On the Person and Office of the Sovereign in Hobbes’ Leviathan.Laurens van Apeldoorn - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (1):49-68.

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References found in this work

Hobbes and the Purely Artificial Person of the State.Q. Skinner - 1999 - Journal of Political Philosophy 7 (1):1–29.

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