Death, nothingness, and subjectivity

In Daniel Kolak & Raymond Martin (eds.), The experience of philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 15-20 (2006)
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Abstract

The words quoted above distill the common secular conception of death. If we decline the traditional religious reassurances of an afterlife, or their fuzzy new age equivalents, and instead take the hard-boiled and thoroughly modern materialist view of death, then we likely end up with Gonzalez-Cruzzi. Rejecting visions of reunions with loved ones or of crossing over into the light, we anticipate the opposite: darkness, silence, an engulfing emptiness. But we would be wrong

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