The Neuroscience of Decision Making and Our Standards for Assessing Competence to Consent

Neuroethics 6 (1):189-196 (2013)

Authors
Steve Clarke
Charles Sturt University
Abstract
Rapid advances in neuroscience may enable us to identify the neural correlates of ordinary decision making. Such knowledge opens up the possibility of acquiring highly accurate information about people’s competence to consent to medical procedures and to participate in medical research. Currently we are unable to determine competence to consent with accuracy and we make a number of unrealistic practical assumptions to deal with our ignorance. Here I argue that if we are able to detect competence to consent and if we are able to develop a reliable neural test of competence to consent, then these assumptions will have to be rejected. I also consider and reject three lines of argument that might be developed by a defender of the status quo in order to protect our current practices regarding judgments of competence in the face of the availability of information about the neural correlates of ordinary human decision making
Keywords Competence  Decision making capacity  Informed consent  Neural correlates  Rule of thumb  Status quo
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1007/s12152-011-9144-2
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 40,649
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Principles of Biomedical Ethics.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
Cognitive Enhancement: Methods, Ethics, Regulatory Challenges. [REVIEW]Nick Bostrom - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):311-341.

View all 16 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Collective Informed Consent and Decision Power.Jukka Varelius - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):39-50.
Three Concepts of Patient Competence.Haavi Morreim - 1983 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (3).
Competence and Ability.Eric Vogelstein - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (5):235-244.
Mental Capacity and the Applied Phenomenology of Judgement.Wayne Martin & Ryan Hickerson - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):195-214.
The Elusive Goal of Informed Consent by Adolescents.Susan E. Zinner - 1995 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (4).
Mental Competence or Best Interests?Ajit Shah - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):151-152.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2011-11-27

Total views
89 ( #85,434 of 2,242,384 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
34 ( #20,374 of 2,242,384 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes

Sign in to use this feature