Authors
Stephen R. L. Clark
University of Liverpool
Abstract
It has been argued that if non-human animals had rights we should be obliged to defend them against predators. I contend that this either does not follow, follows in the abstract but not in practice, or is not absurd. We should defend non-humans against large or unusual dangers, when we can, but should not claim so much authority as to regulate all the relationships of wild things. Some non-human animals are members of our society, and the rhetoric of 'the land as a community' is an attempt, paralleling that of humanism, to create the moral ideal of Earth's Household. But wild animals should be considered as Nozick's 'independents' and have correspondingly fewer claims on our assistance than members of our society. They still have some claims, often strong ones.
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DOI 10.1080/00201747908601871
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References found in this work BETA

Moral Relativism Defended.Gilbert Harman - 1975 - Philosophical Review 84 (1):3-22.
Rights.H. J. McCloskey - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (59):115-127.
The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism.Tom Regan - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):181 - 214.
Interests and Animal Rights.R. G. Frey - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (108):254-259.
A Critique Of Moral Vegetarianism.Michael Martin - 1976 - Reason Papers 3:13-43.

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Citations of this work BETA

Should the Lion Eat Straw Like the Ox? Animal Ethics and the Predation Problem.Jozef Keulartz - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (5):813-834.
The Case for Welfare Biology.Mike R. King, Philip J. Seddon, Andrew J. Moore & Asher A. Soryl - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (2):1-25.
Who Loves Mosquitoes? Care Ethics, Theory of Obligation and Endangered Species.Eleni Panagiotarakou - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (6):1057-1070.

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