E-care as craftsmanship: virtuous work, skilled engagement, and information technology in health care

Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):807-816 (2013)
Authors
Mark Coeckelbergh
University of Vienna
Abstract
Contemporary health care relies on electronic devices. These technologies are not ethically neutral but change the practice of care. In light of Sennett’s work and that of other thinkers (Dewey, Dreyfus, Borgmann) one worry is that “e-care”—care by means of new information and communication technologies—does not promote skilful and careful engagement with patients and hence is neither conducive to the quality of care nor to the virtues of the care worker. Attending to the kinds of knowledge involved in care work and their moral significance, this paper explores what “craftsmanship” means in the context of medicine and health care and discusses whether today the care giver’s craftsmanship is eroded. It is argued that this is a real danger, especially under modern conditions and in the case of telecare, but that whether it happens, and to what extent it happens, depends on whether in a specific practice and given a specific technology e-carers can develop the know-how and skill to engage more intensely with those under their care and to cooperate with their co-workers
Keywords Health care  Medicine  E-care  Ethics  Virtue  Knowledge  Information technology  Craftsmanship  Skill  Know-how  Work
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DOI 10.1007/s11019-013-9463-7
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References found in this work BETA

Trusting Our Selves to Technology.Asle H. Kiran & Peter-Paul Verbeek - 2010 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3-4):409-427.
Philosophy, Methodology and Action Research.Wilfred Carr - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):421–435.

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Citations of this work BETA

The Tragedy of the Master: Automation, Vulnerability, and Distance.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (3):219-229.

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