Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):269-278 (2011)

Authors
Mark Coeckelbergh
University of Vienna
Abstract
Ethical reflections on military robotics can be enriched by a better understanding of the nature and role of these technologies and by putting robotics into context in various ways. Discussing a range of ethical questions, this paper challenges the prevalent assumptions that military robotics is about military technology as a mere means to an end, about single killer machines, and about “military” developments. It recommends that ethics of robotics attend to how military technology changes our aims, concern itself not only with individual robots but also and especially with networks and swarms, and adapt its conceptions of responsibility to the rise of such cloudy and unpredictable systems, which rely on decentralized control and buzz across many spheres of human activity
Keywords Military robotics  Ethics  War  Autonomous intelligent systems  Networks  Swarms
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DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0019-6
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References found in this work BETA

Killer Robots.Robert Sparrow - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):62–77.
How Just Could a Robot War Be?Peter Asaro - 2008 - In P. Brey, A. Briggle & K. Waelbers (eds.), Current Issues in Computing and Philosophy. Ios Press. pp. 50--64.

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Citations of this work BETA

Swarms Are Hell: Warfare as an Anti-Transhuman Choice.Woody Evans - 2013 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 23 (1):56-60.

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