Contempt's Evaluative Presentation and Connection to Accountability

In Michelle Mason (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Contempt. New York: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 131-150 (2018)

Abstract

In this chapter, I defend a novel account of contempt’s evaluative presentation by synthesizing relevant psychological work (Rozin et al. 1999; Fischer and Roseman 2007; Fischer 2011; Hutcherson and Gross 2011) with philosophical insights (Mason 2003; Bell 2005; Abramson 2009; Bell 2013). I then show how a concern about contempt’s status as an emotion involved in holding people accountable can be helpfully addressed. Finally, I gesture at an account of why, when we feel contemptuous toward people, our accountability responses involve withdrawal and exclusion rather than approach and confrontation.

Download options

PhilArchive

External links

  • This entry has no external links. Add one.
Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2018-04-22

Downloads
263 (#42,905)

6 months
33 (#27,031)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Zac Cogley
Ohio State University (PhD)

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Contempt as a Moral Attitude.Michelle Mason - 2003 - Ethics 113 (2):234-272.
A Woman’s Scorn.Macalester Bell - 2000 - Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
Hard Feelings: The Moral Psychology of Contempt. [REVIEW]Alfred Archer - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (271):395-397.
Contempt and the Cultivation of Character.Ryan West - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):493-519.
Wollstonecraft and the Political Value of Contempt.Ross Carroll - 2015 - European Journal of Political Theory 18 (1):1474885115593762.
Responsibility, Accountability and Governance.John Kaler - 2002 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 11 (4):327-334.
Responsibility, Accountability and Governance.John Kaler - 2002 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 11 (4):327–334.
Contempt, Community, and the Interruption of Sense.Bryan Lueck - 2017 - Critical Horizons 18 (2):154-167.