Schema

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2008)

Authors
John Corcoran
State University of New York, Buffalo
Abstract
A schema (plural: schemata, or schemas), also known as a scheme (plural: schemes), is a linguistic template or pattern together with a rule for using it to specify a potentially infinite multitude of phrases, sentences, or arguments, which are called instances of the schema. Schemas are used in logic to specify rules of inference, in mathematics to describe theories with infinitely many axioms, and in semantics to give adequacy conditions for definitions of truth. 1. What is a Schema? 2. Uses of Schemas 3. The Ontological Status of Schemas 4. Schemas in the History of Logic Bibliography
Keywords SCHEMA  INSTANCE  TARSKI BICONDITIONAL  STRING  CHARACTER  CONCATENATION  AXIOM  ARGUMENT SCHEMA  SENTENCE SCHEMA  VALID/PANVALID/NEUTROVALID/PANINVALID
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The Different Ways in Which Logic is (Said to Be) Formal.Catarina Dutilh Novaes - 2011 - History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (4):303 - 332.
Term Kinds and the Formality of Aristotelian Modal Logic.Joshua Mendelsohn - 2017 - History and Philosophy of Logic 38 (2):99-126.

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