Aristotle's anatomical philosophy of nature

Biology and Philosophy 13 (3):311-339 (1998)
Abstract
This paper explores the anatomical foundations of Aristotle's natural philosophy. Rather than simply looking at the body, he contrives specific procedures for revealing unmanifest phenomena. In some cases, these interventions seem extensive enough to qualify as experiments. At the work bench, one can observe the parts of animals in the manner Aristotle describes, even if his descriptions seem at odds with 20th century textbooks. Manipulating animals allows us to recover his teleological thought more fully. This consideration of Aristotle as a sophisticated biologist helps our reading of his writings in other areas of philosophy.
Keywords Aristotle  Anatomy  Dissection  Vivisection  Experiment  Heart
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Reprint years 2004
DOI 10.1023/A:1006515414945
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