Psychiatry Bulletin 41:65-70. (2017)

Authors
Havi Carel
University of Bristol
Ian James Kidd
Nottingham University
Abstract
Epistemic injustice is a harm done to a person in their capacity as an epistemic subject by undermining her capacity to engage in epistemic practices such as giving knowledge to others or making sense of one’s experiences. It has been argued that those who suffer from medical conditions are more vulnerable to epistemic injustice than the healthy. This paper claims that people with mental disorders are even more vulnerable to epistemic injustice than those with somatic illnesses. Two kinds of contributory factors for epistemic injustice in psychiatric patients are outlined: global and specific. Some suggestions are made to counteract the effects of these contributory factors, for instance we suggest that physicians should participate in groups where the subjective experience of patients is explored, and learn to become more aware of their own unconscious prejudices towards psychiatric patients.
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DOI 10.1192/pb.bp.115.050682
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Contributory Injustice in Psychiatry.Alex James Miller Tate - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):97-100.
Distributive Epistemic Justice in Science.Gürol Irzik & Faik Kurtulmus - 2021 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.

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