Authors
Abstract
This paper addresses the questions raised by the evidence presented that many cardinal psycho-analytic notions bear a strong resemblance to the ideas of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. In the process, the author considers not only that the 19th century Zeitgeist, given its preoccupation with the unconscious, created a fertile ground for the birth of psychoanalysis, but the influence on the Weltanschauung of Freud, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche of their common German cultural heritage, their shared admiration for Shakespeare and love of Hellenic culture, and the meteoric rise of science. Although influence may not be sharply separated from confluence, the parallels between Freud's concepts and those of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche are too specific to be coincidental. And yet, Freud vehemently denied ever having read these philosophers’ works until “very late in life”. It is suggested that an unconscious sense of guilt may have induced that denial.This study adopts a cross-sectional approach that juxtaposes Freud's cardinal concepts with the ideas of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. Its tripartite structure has the advantage of observing similarities and differences not only between Freud and the two philosophers, but also between Nietzsche and Schopenhauer. The focal concepts include: the unconscious; ego, id and superego; libido; drives; repression; sublimation; dreams; catharsis; free association; primary and secondary process thinking; Oedipus complex; repetition compulsion; the pleasure principle; mourning and melancholia; a criminal from a sense of guilt; and the death instinct.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1080/20797222.2015.1101836
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 62,481
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Thus Spoke Zarathustra.Friedrich Nietzsche - 1961 - New York: Viking Press.
The Interpretation of Dreams.Sigmund Freud & A. A. Brill - 1900 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 10 (20):551-555.
Civilization and its Discontents.Sigmund Freud - 1952/1930 - In John Martin Rich (ed.), Readings in the Philosophy of Education. Belmont, Calif., Wadsworth Pub. Co..

View all 26 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Nietzsche: Bipolar Disorder and Creativity.Eva M. Cybulska - 2019 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 19 (1):51-63.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Schopenhauer.Julian Young - 2005 - Routledge.
Schopenhauer.Julian Young - 2005 - Routledge.
Schopenhauer.Julian Young - 2005 - Routledge.
Nietzsche Contra Freud on Bad Conscience.Donovan Miyasaki - 2010 - Nietzsche-Studien 39 (1):434-454.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2016-06-30

Total views
12 ( #781,517 of 2,446,288 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #456,806 of 2,446,288 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes