The Acquired Virtues are Real Virtues

Faith and Philosophy 32 (4):453-470 (2015)
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Abstract

In a recent paper, Eleonore Stump argues that Aquinas thinks the acquired virtues are “not real at all” because they do not contribute to true moral life, which she argues is the life joined to God by the infused virtues and the gifts and fruits of the Holy Spirit. Against this, I argue in two stages that Aquinas thinks the acquired virtues are real virtues. First, I respond to Stump’s four arguments against the reality of the acquired virtues. Second, I show four ways in which the acquired virtues contribute to the highest ethical life for Aquinas.

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Author's Profile

Brandon Dahm
Franciscan University of Steubenville

References found in this work

Thomistic Hylomorphism, Self-Determination, Neuroplasticity, and Grace.Daniel D. De Haan - 2011 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85:99-120.

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