The Joint Effects of Machiavellianism and Ethical Environment on Whistle-Blowing

Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):153-172 (2013)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Given the importance of the Machiavellianism construct on informing a wide range of ethics research, we focus on gaining a better understanding of Machiavellianism within the whistle-blower context. In this regard, we examine the effect of Machiavellianism on whistle-blowing, focusing on the underlying mechanisms through which Machiavellianism affects whistle-blowing. Further, because individuals who are higher in Machiavellianism (high Machs) are expected to be less likely to report wrongdoing, we examine the ability of an organization’s ethical environment to increase whistle-blowing intentions of high Machs. Results from a sample of 116 MBA students support our premise that Machiavellianism is negatively related to whistle-blowing. Further, we find that Machiavellianism has an indirect effect on whistle-blowing through perceived benefits and perceived responsibility. Finally, we find that a strong ethical environment, relative to a weak ethical environment, increases whistle-blowing intentions incrementally more for individuals who are higher in Machiavellianism. Taken together, these findings extend our understanding of how Machiavellianism and an organization’s ethical environment impact whistle-blowing

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 74,181

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Whistle Blowing and Rational Loyalty.Wim Vandekerckhove & M. S. Ronald Commers - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):225-233.

Analytics

Added to PP
2012-10-07

Downloads
84 (#143,287)

6 months
2 (#275,148)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?