A four-part working bibliography of neuroethics: part 2 – neuroscientific studies of morality and ethics


Authors
Martina Darragh
Georgetown University
Abstract
Moral philosophy and psychology have sought to define the nature of right and wrong, and good and evil. The industrial turn of the twentieth century fostered increasingly technological approaches that conjoined philosophy to psychology, and psychology to the natural sciences. Thus, moral philosophy and psychology became ever more vested to investigations of the anatomic structures and physiologic processes involved in cognition, emotion and behavior - ultimately falling under the rubric of the neurosciences. Since 2002, neuroscientific studies of moral thought, emotions and behaviors have become known as – and a part of – the relatively new discipline of neuroethics. Herein we present Part 2 of a bibliography of neuroethics from 2002–2013 addressing the “neuroscience of ethics” – studies of putative neural substrates and mechanisms involved in cognitive, emotional and behavioral processes of morality and ethics
Keywords Neuroethics  Neuroscience  Morality  Moral Psychology  Ethics  Bibliography
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DOI 10.1186/s13010-015-0022-0
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References found in this work BETA

Neuroethics: Challenges for the 21st Century.Neil Levy - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.

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What Makes Neuroethics Possible?Fernando Vidal - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (2):32-58.

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