Feminist Perspectives on Global Warming, Genocide, and Card's Theory of Evil

Hypatia 24 (1):160 - 177 (2009)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

This essay explores several moral issues raised by global warming through the lens of Claudia Card's theory of evil. I focus on Alaskan villages in the sub-Arctic whose residents must relocate owing to extreme erosion, melting sea ice, and rising water levels. I use Card's discussion of genocide as social death to argue that failure to help these groups maintain their unique cultural identities can be thought of as genocidal

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,931

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP
2013-09-29

Downloads
63 (#262,459)

6 months
7 (#491,855)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Victoria Davion
Last affiliation: University of Georgia

References found in this work

Practical Ethics.Peter Singer - 1979 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler.
The Politics of Reality: Essays in Feminist Theory.Marilyn Frye - 1983 - Trumansburg, NY: The Crossing Press.
Active and passive euthanasia.James Rachels - 2000 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press USA.
The atrocity paradigm: a theory of evil.Claudia Card - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.

View all 8 references / Add more references