Is memory for remembering? Recollection as a form of episodic hypothetical thinking

Synthese 191 (2):1-31 (2014)
Authors
Felipe De Brigard
Duke University
Abstract
Misremembering is a systematic and ordinary occurrence in our daily lives. Since it is commonly assumed that the function of memory is to remember the past, misremembering is typically thought to happen because our memory system malfunctions. In this paper I argue that not all cases of misremembering are due to failures in our memory system. In particular, I argue that many ordinary cases of misremembering should not be seen as instances of memory’s malfunction, but rather as the normal result of a larger cognitive system that performs a different function, and for which remembering is just one operation. Building upon extant psychological and neuroscientific evidence, I offer a picture of memory as an integral part of a larger system that supports not only thinking of what was the case and what potentially could be the case, but also what could have been the case. More precisely, I claim that remembering is a particular operation of a cognitive system that permits the flexible recombination of different components of encoded traces into representations of possible past events that might or might not have occurred, in the service of constructing mental simulations of possible future events. So that imagination and memory are but one thing, which for diverse considerations hath diverse names.Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan 1.2.
Keywords Memory  Cognitive function  Remembering  Hypothetical thinking  Core brain network  Episodic future thinking  Episodic counterfactual thinking
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Reprint years 2014
DOI 10.1007/s11229-013-0247-7
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References found in this work BETA

Elements of Episodic Memory.Endel Tulving - 1985 - Oxford University Press.
Action in Perception.Alva Noë - 2005 - MIT Press.
The Principles of Psychology.William James - 1890 - Dover Publications.

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Citations of this work BETA

Tolerant Enactivist Cognitive Science.Thomas Raleigh - 2018 - Philosophical Explorations 21 (2):226-244.
The Roots of Remembering: Radically Enactive Recollecting.Daniel D. Hutto & Anco Peeters - 2018 - In Kourken Michaelian, Dorothea Debus & Denis Perrin (eds.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory. New York: Routledge. pp. 97-118.

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