The role of intuitive ontologies in scientific understanding – the case of human evolution

Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):351-368 (2007)
Abstract
Psychological evidence suggests that laypeople understand the world around them in terms of intuitive ontologies which describe broad categories of objects in the world, such as ‘person’, ‘artefact’ and ‘animal’. However, because intuitive ontologies are the result of natural selection, they only need to be adaptive; this does not guarantee that the knowledge they provide is a genuine reflection of causal mechanisms in the world. As a result, science has parted ways with intuitive ontologies. Nevertheless, since the brain is evolved to understand objects in the world according to these categories, we can expect that they continue to play a role in scientific understanding. Taking the case of human evolution, we explore relationships between intuitive ontological and scientific understanding. We show that intuitive ontologies not only shape intuitions on human evolution, but also guide the direction and topics of interest in its research programmes. Elucidating the relationships between intuitive ontologies and science may help us gain a clearer insight into scientific understanding.
Keywords Philosophy   Evolutionary Biology   Philosophy of Biology
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DOI 10.1007/s10539-006-9036-8
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Chimpanzee Minds: Suspiciously Human?Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):157-160.
Psychological Essentialism in Children.S. Gelman - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):404-409.

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Indigenous and Scientific Kinds.David Ludwig - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (1).

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