Abstract
This study aims to contribute to emerging human-robot interaction research by adding longitudinal findings to a limited number of long-term social robotics home studies. We placed 70 robots in users’ homes for a period of up to six months, and used questionnaires and interviews to collect data at six points during this period. Results indicate that users’ evaluations of the robot dropped initially, but later rose after the robot had been used for a longer period of time. This is congruent with the so-called mere-exposure effect, which shows an increasing positive evaluation of a novel stimulus once people become familiar with it. Before adoption, users focus on control beliefs showing that previous experiences with robots or other technologies allows to create a mental image of what having and using a robot in the home would entail. After adoption, users focus on utilitarian and hedonic attitudes showing that especially usefulness, social presence, enjoyment and attractiveness are important factors for long-term acceptance.
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DOI 10.1075/is.17.3.08deg
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References found in this work BETA

Robotic Pets in the Lives of Preschool Children.Peter H. Kahn, Batya Friedman, Deanne R. Pérez-Granados & Nathan G. Freier - 2006 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 7 (3):405-436.
Do Not Despair: There Is Life After Constructivism.Wiebe E. Bijker - 1993 - Science, Technology and Human Values 18 (1):113-138.

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Citations of this work BETA

Human-Robot Collaboration for Surface Treatment Tasks.Luis Gracia, J. Ernesto Solanes, Pau Muñoz-Benavent, Jaime Valls Miro, Carlos Perez-Vidal & Josep Tornero - 2019 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 20 (1):148-184.
Children’s Acceptance of Social Robots.Chiara de Jong, Jochen Peter, Rinaldo Kühne & Alex Barco - 2019 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 20 (3):393-425.

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