How can contributors to open-source communities be Trusted? On the assumption, inference, and substitution of trust

Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):327-341 (2010)
Abstract
Open-source communities that focus on content rely squarely on the contributions of invisible strangers in cyberspace. How do such communities handle the problem of trusting that strangers have good intentions and adequate competence? This question is explored in relation to communities in which such trust is a vital issue: peer production of software (FreeBSD and Mozilla in particular) and encyclopaedia entries (Wikipedia in particular). In the context of open-source software, it is argued that trust was inferred from an underlying ‘hacker ethic’, which already existed. The Wikipedian project, by contrast, had to create an appropriate ethic along the way. In the interim, the assumption simply had to be that potential contributors were trustworthy; they were granted ‘substantial trust’. Subsequently, projects from both communities introduced rules and regulations which partly substituted for the need to perceive contributors as trustworthy. They faced a design choice in the continuum between a high-discretion design (granting a large amount of trust to contributors) and a low-discretion design (leaving only a small amount of trust to contributors). It is found that open-source designs for software and encyclopaedias are likely to converge in the future towards a mid-level of discretion. In such a design the anonymous user is no longer invested with unquestioning trust.
Keywords design  discretion  FreeBSD  hacker ethic  Mozilla  open source software  trust  Wikipedia
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DOI 10.1007/s10676-010-9230-x
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References found in this work BETA
Trust and Antitrust.Annette Baier - 1986 - Ethics 96 (2):231-260.
Trusting Virtual Trust.Paul B. de Laat - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):167-180.
Trust, Hope and Empowerment.Victoria McGeer - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (2):237 – 254.
Trust, Reliance, and the Internet1.Philip Pettit - 2008 - In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Analyse & Kritik. Cambridge University Press. pp. 161.
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