Neuroethics and the Ethical Parity Principle

Neuroethics 7 (3):317-325 (2014)

Authors
Joseph DeMarco
Cleveland State University
Abstract
Neil Levy offers the most prominent moral principles that are specifically and exclusively designed to apply to neuroethics. His two closely related principles, labeled as versions of the ethical parity principle , are intended to resolve moral concerns about neurological modification and enhancement [1]. Though EPP is appealing and potentially illuminating, we reject the first version and substantially modify the second. Since his first principle, called EPP , is dependent on the contention that the mind literally extends into external props such as paper notebooks and electronic devices, we begin with an examination of the extended mind hypothesis and its use in Levy’s EPP . We argue against reliance on EMH as support for EPP . We turn to his second principle, EPP , which is not dependent on EMH but is tied to the acceptable claim that the mind is embedded in, because dependent on, external props. As a result of our critique of EPP , we develop a modified version of EPP , which we argue is more acceptable than Levy’s principle. Finally, we evaluate the applicability of our version of EPP
Keywords Neuroethics  Levy  Human enhancement  Bioethics  Extended mind
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DOI 10.1007/s12152-014-9211-6
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References found in this work BETA

The Extended Mind.Andy Clark & David J. Chalmers - 1998 - Analysis 58 (1):7-19.
Neuroethics: Challenges for the 21st Century.Neil Levy - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
Loops, Constitution and Cognitive Extension.S. Orestis Palermos - 2014 - Cognitive Systems Research 27:25-41.
Extended Cognition and Functionalism.Mark Sprevak - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy 106 (9):503-527.

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Citations of this work BETA

An Evaluative Conservative Case for Biomedical Enhancement.John Danaher - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):611-618.

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Neuroethics: Ethics and the Sciences of the Mind.Neil Levy - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):69-81.
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Introduction.Maartje Schermer & Ineke Bolt - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (2):61-62.

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