The Neuroscience of Moral Judgment

In Aaron Zimmerman, Karen Jones & Mark Timmons (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Moral Epistemology (2018)

Authors
Guy Kahane
Oxford University
Abstract
This chapter examines the relevance of the cognitive science of morality to moral epistemology, with special focus on the issue of the reliability of moral judgments. It argues that the kind of empirical evidence of most importance to moral epistemology is at the psychological rather than neural level. The main theories and debates that have dominated the cognitive science of morality are reviewed with an eye to their epistemic significance.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

The Necessity of Moral Reasoning.Leland Saunders - 2018 - Journal of Value Inquiry 52 (1):37-57.
Morality and Cognitive Science.Regina A. Rini - 2015 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
The Emotional Basis of Moral Judgments.Jesse Prinz - 2006 - Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):29-43.
Moral Judgment as a Natural Kind.Victor Kumar - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (11):2887-2910.
Causation in Moral Judgment.Michael Kurak - 2011 - Mind and Matter 9 (2):153-170.
Moral Realism and Moral Judgments.Frederik Kaufman - 1992 - Erkenntnis 36 (1):103 - 112.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2018-12-11

Total views
901 ( #2,733 of 2,250,069 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
526 ( #538 of 2,250,069 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes

Sign in to use this feature