Grotiana 29 (1):77-84 (2008)

Abstract
The subject of this article is the way in which Grotius imitated his Roman model Tacitus in his own Annales. He does this by quotations and allusions, but also, more subtly, by adopting some of Tacitus stylistic peculiarities like brevitas, inconcinnitas and the insertion of sententiae. The imitation of Tacitus is most conspicuous in important sections of the Annales like the opening chapters and the introductions of the main characters. Tacitus is the prime model of Grotius, but not the only one, as is shown by borrowings from Sallust, Pliny the Younger and Vergil
Keywords NACHLEBEN   TACITUS   ANNALES ET HISTORIAE   STYLISTIC IMITATION
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DOI 10.1163/187607508X384706
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