(1989)

Authors
Philip Devine
Providence College
Abstract
This book presents a defense of the reality of God in the sense in which Nietzsche proclaimed His death. It explores various contemporary versions of Nietzsche's maxim God is dead and proposes an alternative to them. Philip E.Devine critically examines three views that, in one way or another, accept the death of God and take it as central to the intellectual life: pragmatism, which asserts that the only end of the intellectual life is the pursuit of worldly goods other than truth; relativism', which admits a multiplicity of truths corresponding to the modes of life pursued by human beings; and nihilism, to which the pursuit of truth is a deception. Devine then defends his own position on the nature of God and religion and argues for a convergence between the concerns of faith and philosophy.
Keywords God   Nihilism   Pragmatism   Relativity   Religion   Theism
Categories No categories specified
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ISBN(s) 0268016402   0268016402   9780268016401
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Morality and Religion.Tim Mawson - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (6):1033-1043.

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