Philosophical assumptions and presumptions about trafficking for prostitution

In Christien van den Anker & Jeroen Doomernik (eds.), Trafficking and women's rights. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 43-54 (2006)
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Abstract

This chapter critically examines two frequently found assumptions in the debate about trafficking for prostitution: 1. That the sale of sexual services is like the sale of any other good or service; 2. That by and large women involved in trafficking for prostitution freely consent to sell such services.

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Donna Dickenson
Birkbeck, University of London

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