Transnational Quarantine Rhetorics: Public Mobilization in SARS and in H1N1 Flu

Journal of Medical Humanities 35 (2):191-210 (2014)

Abstract
This essay examines how Chinese governments, local communities, and overseas Chinese in North America responded to the perceived health risks of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and H1N1 flu through the use of public and participatory rhetoric about risk and quarantines. Focusing on modes of security and quarantine practices, I examine how globalization and the social crises surrounding SARS and H1N1 flu operated to regulate differently certain bodies and areas. I identify three types of quarantines and conduct a transnational comparative analysis to investigate the relationships among quarantines, rhetoric, and public communication. I argue that health authorities must openly acknowledge the legitimacy of public input and actively seek public support regarding health crises. Only by collaborating with concerned communities and citizens and by providing careful guidance for public participation can health institutions ensure the efficacy of quarantine orders during emerging epidemics
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1007/s10912-014-9282-8
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 46,509
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

World Risk Society.Ulrich Beck - 2012 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Ethics and Public Health Emergencies: Restrictions on Liberty.Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):1 – 5.
Planning for Pandemics: Lessons From the Past Decade.Belinda Bennett & Terry Carney - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):419-428.
J. S. Mill and the American Law of Quarantine.Wendy E. Parmet - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):210-222.
Kaci Hickox: Public Health and the Politics of Fear.Steven H. Miles - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):17-19.
Reciprocity and Neuroscience in Public Health Law.A. M. Viens - 2011 - In Michael Freeman (ed.), Law and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
Public Health and Public Goods.Jonny Anomaly - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (3):251-259.
Political Solidarity, Justice and Public Health.Meena Krishnamurthy - 2013 - Public Health Ethics 6 (2):129-141.
Ethics and Public Health Emergencies: Encouraging Responsibility.Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):1 – 4.
Public Health Ethics: The Voices of Practitioners.Ruth Gaare Bernheim - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):104-109.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2015-02-06

Total views
6 ( #1,000,852 of 2,286,502 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
5 ( #250,515 of 2,286,502 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes

Sign in to use this feature