The Phenomenal World (2019)

Authors
Kevin Dorst
University of Pittsburgh
Abstract
I argue that several of the psychological tendencies that drive polarization could arise from purely rational mechanisms, due to the fact that some types of evidence are predictably more ambiguous than others.
Keywords polarization  rationality  biases
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