Correcting the Scholarly Record for Research Integrity: In the Aftermath of Plagiarism

Cham: Springer (2018)
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Abstract

This volume is the first book-length study on post-publication responses to academic plagiarism in humanities disciplines. It demonstrates that the correction of the scholarly literature for plagiarism is not a task for editors and publishers alone; each member of the research community has an indispensable role in maintaining the integrity of the published literature in the aftermath of plagiarism. If untreated, academic plagiarism damages the integrity of the scholarly record, corrupts the surrounding academic enterprise, and creates inefficiencies across all levels of knowledge production. By providing case studies from the field of philosophy and related disciplines, the volume exhibits that current post-publication responses to academic plagiarism are insufficient. It catalogues how humanities disciplines fall short in comparison with the natural and biomedical sciences for ensuring the integrity of the body of published research. This volume provides clarity about how to conceptualize the scholarly record, surveys the traditional methods for correcting it, and argues for new interventions to improve the reliability of the body of published research. The book is valuable not only to those in the field of philosophy and other humanities disciplines, but also to those interested in research ethics, meta-science, and the sociology of research.

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Chapters

Beyond the Published Retraction

This chapter considers ways in which published corrections of the scholarly record are disseminated throughout the research community. Even when editors and publishers issue corrections, these notifications can still be minimized to the point of irrelevance if they are not reflected in the research ... see more

Contested Authorship, Self-Plagiarism, and the Scholarly Record

This chapter considers recent cases of contested authorship in two articles involving an American philosophy professor. The examination of these unusual publishing circumstances, which include allegations of self-plagiarism, places in high relief the requirements of genuine authorship, the complexit... see more

Publishing Corrections of the Scholarly Record: Some Test Cases

This chapter examines the responses of editors and publishers who were presented with evidence of suspected plagiarism in a series of 14 articles and book chapters for one author of record. As the publications divide into those in philosophy and those in health communication, a comparison is possibl... see more

Academic Whistleblowing

Despite the essential role that academic whistleblowers serve in initiating the oftentimes lengthy process of correcting the scholarly record, individuals who disclose evidence of suspected plagiarism are often subject to considerable backlash. To be sure, the evidence they provide, even when impecc... see more

A Test Case for Published Corrections: The Discipline of Philosophy

Individuals discovered to have engaged in wide-scale serial plagiarism in philosophy are relatively few, but the academic publishers falling victim to them are many. Some of the most respected publishing houses in philosophy have recently faced the issue of having published plagiarized material. The... see more

What Is Academic Plagiarism?

This chapter defends a fourfold heuristic for determining when academic plagiarism has occurred. Drawing from contemporary literature on research integrity, I propose that academic plagiarism has been committed when there is: a non-trivial appropriation of words, images, or formulas, with inadequate... see more

Defining the Scholarly Record

This chapter provides a conceptualization of the scholarly record. I propose that items that belong indisputably to the scholarly record meet six hallmarks: the Knowledge, Authorship, Publication, Library, Database, and Discipline conditions. Books issued by scholarly presses and articles appearing ... see more

Introduction

This chapter introduces a book-length study on post-publication responses to academic plagiarism in humanities disciplines. Academic plagiarism damages the integrity of the scholarly record, corrupts the surrounding academic enterprise, and creates inefficiencies across all levels of knowledge produ... see more

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Self-Plagiarism or Appropriate Textual Re-Use?Tracey Bretag & Saadia Mahmud - 2009 - Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (3):193-205.
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Author's Profile

M. V. Dougherty
Ohio Dominican University

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