Philosophy of Science 71 (5):926-931 (2004)

Authors
Phil Dowe
Australian National University
Abstract
In this paper I show how the conserved quantity theory, or more generally the process theory of Wesley Salmon and myself, provides a sufficient condition in an analysis of causation. To do so I will show how it handles the problem of alleged 'misconnections'. I show what the conserved quantity theory says about such cases, and why intuitions are not to be taken as sacrosanct.
Keywords C1  780199 Other  440107 Metaphysics  Causal relations   Intuitions   Cases of causation
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DOI 10.1086/425059
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References found in this work BETA

Causality and Explanation.Wesley C. Salmon - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
Causation as Influence.David K. Lewis - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):182-197.
Physical Causation.Phil Dowe - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
Causality and Explanation: A Reply to Two Critiques.Wesley C. Salmon - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (3):461-477.

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Citations of this work BETA

Carnap on Concept Determination: Methodology for Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW]James Justus - 2012 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (2):161-179.
Counterfactuals and Counterparts: Defending a Neo-Humean Theory of Causation.Neil McDonnell - 2015 - Dissertation, Macquarie University and University of Glasgow

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