Environmental Values 18 (3):285-312 (2009)

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Abstract
The creation of new wetlands along rivers as an instrument to mitigate flood risks in times of climate change seduces us to approach the landscape from a 'managerial' perspective and threatens a more place-oriented approach. How to provide ecological restoration with a broad cultural context that can help prevent these new landscapes from becoming non-places, devoid of meaning and with no real connection to our habitable world. In this paper, I discuss three possible alternative interpretations of the meaning of places and place attachment in these 'new nature' projects, and show how all three imply a different view on human identity and history
Keywords Environmental philosophy  Environmental ethics  Environmental hermeneutics  Ecological restoration  Place attachment
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DOI 10.3197/096327109X12474739376451
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Faking Nature.Robert Elliot - 1982 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):81 – 93.
Getting Back Into Place.Edward S. Casey - 1996 - Human Studies 19 (4):433-439.

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