Authors
Jane Dryden
Mount Allison University
Abstract
People with gut issues are often constrained in the foods they are able to eat. The choices they are able to make about food, however, are shaped not merely by specific medical and dietary needs but also by social, relational, and environmental factors such as the presence of trusted and supportive others who take their needs seriously. Drawing on work in disability theory and relational autonomy, as well as interviews undertaken in summer 2019, the paper explores the ways that choices are enabled or undermined, and argues that these should be taken into account in work on the ethics and politics of food.
Keywords gut  disability theory  relational autonomy  food
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References found in this work BETA

The Absent Body.Drew Leder - 1990 - University of Chicago Press.
Feminist, Queer, Crip.Alison Kafer - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
The Feminist Case Against Relational Autonomy.Serene J. Khader - 2020 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 17 (5):499-526.

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