Old and New Fallacies in Port-Royal Logic

Argumentation 33 (2):241-267 (2019)
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Abstract

The paper discusses the place and the status of fallacies in Arnauld and Nicole’s Port-Royal Logic, which seems to be the first book to introduce a radical change from the traditional Aristotelian account of fallacies. The most striking innovation is not in the definition of a fallacy but in the publication of a new list of fallacies, dropping some Aristotelian ones and adding more than ten new ones. The first part of the paper deals with the context of the book’s publication. We then show the influence of Cartesian and Augustinian/Pascalian philosophy on the whole book, especially their common critical views about logic, dialectic and their traditional academic teaching. The third part of the paper discusses the two chapters on fallacies. It focuses on their place in the book and their relation with its general orientation, before turning to their content, closely connected with some major concerns of the time.

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Michel Dufour
Université Sorbonne-Nouvelle

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References found in this work

Fallacies.C. L. Hamblin - 1970 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 160:492-492.
Pensées.Blaise Pascal - 1670 - In Aloysius Martinich, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger. London: Blackwell. pp. 111-112.
Logic, or, The art of thinking: containing, besides common rules, several new observations appropriate for forming judgment.Antoine Arnauld - 1996 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Pierre Nicole & Jill Vance Buroker.
Pensées and Other Writings.Blaise Pascal (ed.) - 1670 - Oxford University Press.

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