Hobbes's Materialism in the Early 1640s

British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):437 – 448 (2005)
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Abstract

I argue that Hobbes isn't really a materialist in the early 1640s (in, e.g., the Third Objections to Descartes's Meditations). That is, he doesn't assert that bodies are the only substances. However, he does think that bodies are the only substances we can think about using imagistic ideas.

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Stewart Duncan
University at Buffalo

Citations of this work

Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):391-409.
Locke, God, and Materialism.Stewart Duncan - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 10:101-31.
Leibniz on Hobbes’s Materialism.Stewart Duncan - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):11-18.
Hobbes, Universal Names, and Nominalism.Stewart Duncan - 2017 - In Stefano Di Bella & Tad M. Schmaltz (eds.), The Problem of Universals in Early Modern Philosophy. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

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References found in this work

Soul and mind: Life and thought in the seventeenth century.Daniel Garber - 1998 - In Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.), The Cambridge history of seventeenth-century philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 1--559.
Hobbes versus Descartes.Edwin Curley - 1995 - In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

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