Knowledge of God in Leviathan

History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (1):31-48 (2005)
Authors
Stewart Duncan
University of Florida
Abstract
Hobbes denies in Leviathan that we have an idea of God. He does think, though, that God exists, and does not even deny that we can think about God, even though he says we have no idea of God. There is, Hobbes thinks, another cognitive mechanism by means of which we can think about God. That mechanism allows us only to think a few things about God though. This constrains what Hobbes can say about our knowledge of God, and grounds his belief in a fairly strong version of the thesis that God is incomprehensible.
Keywords Hobbes  God  knowledge  religion  Leviathan  relative ideas
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Leibniz on Hobbes's Materialism.Stewart Duncan - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):11-18.
'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality.Liam P. Dempsey - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.
The Theological Foundation of Hobbesian Physics: A Defence of Corporeal God.Geoffrey Gorham - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):240 - 261.

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