How Neurons Mean: A Neurocomputational Theory of Representational Content

Dissertation, Washington University in St. Louis (2000)

Abstract

Questions concerning the nature of representation and what representations are about have been a staple of Western philosophy since Aristotle. Recently, these same questions have begun to concern neuroscientists, who have developed new techniques and theories for understanding how the locus of neurobiological representation, the brain, operates. My dissertation draws on philosophy and neuroscience to develop a novel theory of representational content

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