Capital as a Social Kind: Definitions and Transformations in the Critique of Political Economy

Routledge (2011)

Authors
Abstract
Capital as a Social Kind provides an introduction to social kinds in social theory. Thinking about kinds, the way we sort the things of the world into categories -- water, for example, is a natural kind – has made an important contribution to our understanding of science in the last half century, but these advances have been largely applicable to the natural, rather than the social sciences. Drawing on the rich examples offered by Marx’s analysis of capital and exploring a methodology that will be of interest to both Marxist and non-Marxist social theorists alike, Capital as a Social Kind extends this approach to the study of social life. The book argues that, provoked by his study of Aristotle, Marx’s attentions foreshadowed contemporary themes in the realist philosophy of science. Importantly, social kind analysis is relevant not only to understanding his critique of political economy but illuminates also a materialist study of law, justice, morality and the transition to socialism. Social kind analysis also opens a path for the development of today’s moral realism by suggesting the need for a systematic study of the causal structures of social life. In this respect the importance of normative themes in Marxism is defended against claims that the Marxist tradition lacks the resources to call capitalism unjust or to defend morality and human rights. The origin of capital, Marx suggests, can be found in the rupture of an original unity between the laborer and the means of labor, and the book explores the way a structure of separations best characterizes capital as a social kind. This uncovers a little developed emphasis in Marx’s work – his focus on the phenomena of separation that define our lives and also on forms of association required to transcend them. Given that capitalism has made the instruments of labor instruments of social labor, forms of association that would recover worker control over them must be democratic. The transition to socialism, the book concludes, just is winning the battle of democracy. This book will be of interest to students and researchers of economics, philosophy and indeed any social science subject.
Keywords marxism  philosophy of science  moral and legal theory  social and political theory  the transition to socialism  political economy of capital
Categories (categorize this paper)
Buy this book $67.07 new   Amazon page
ISBN(s) 0415776910   1138013110
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Translate to english
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 58,518
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Philosophy of Economics.Daniel M. Hausman - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

The Facets of Social Capital.Mikael Rostila - 2011 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (3):308-326.
The Political Economy of the Household.Jordi Mundós - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 22:87-95.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2011-04-09

Total views
1 ( #1,468,998 of 2,421,915 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #545,840 of 2,421,915 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

Sorry, there are not enough data points to plot this chart.

My notes