Hegel-Studien 50:63-95 (2017)

Authors
Alexander T. Englert
Princeton University
Abstract
In the *Science of Logic*, Hegel states unequivocally that the category of “life” is a strictly logical, or pure, form of thinking. His treatment of actual life – i.e., that which empirically constitutes nature – arises first in his *Philosophy of Nature* when the logic is applied under the conditions of space and time. Nevertheless, many commentators find Hegel’s development of this category as a purely logical one especially difficult to accept. Indeed, they find this development only comprehensible as long as one simultaneously assumes that Hegel breaks his promise to let the logic do the leading. However, if Hegel were to in fact allow the logical development to be led by biological analogies at this point, problems would ensue. Not only would it contradict his own speculative method, which should secure the necessity of the categories, but it would also endanger the ontological generality of the category of life itself. Beyond undermining his method and the logical integrity of the category, however, I will argue that such a reading makes the transition to the next category of “cognition” unintelligible and problematic. My aim in the first part of this paper is to argue how logical life can be read as a pure category. I then argue in the second part how my reconstruction makes the transition to cognition intelligible without resorting to profane or supernatural interpretations.
Keywords Science of Logic  Subjective Logic  Idea of Life  Hegel  Life  Cognition  Transition  Biology  German Idealism  Hegel's Naturphilosophie
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy

 PhilArchive page | Other versions
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

The View from Nowhere.Thomas Nagel - 1986 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 92 (2):280-281.
Hegel.Charles Taylor - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
De anima. ARISTOTLE - 1956 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 83:183.

View all 15 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Hegel’s Living Logic.Jon K. Burmeister - 2013 - Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):243-264.
Hegel and Naturphilosophie.Frederick C. Beiser - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):135-147.
Hegel Within Contemporary Logic.Elena Ficara - 2013 - Teoria 33 (1):297-312.
The Role of Logic "Commonly So Called" in Hegel's Science of Logic.Paul Redding - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):281-301.
Hegel’s Logic of Actuality.Karen Ng - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (1):139-172.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2017-04-03

Total views
124 ( #76,160 of 2,385,937 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
18 ( #39,455 of 2,385,937 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes