New York, NY, USA: Routledge (2020)

Authors
Bob Fischer
Texas State University
Abstract
Intensive animal agriculture wrongs many, many animals. Philosophers have argued, on this basis, that most people in wealthy Western contexts are morally obligated to avoid animal products. This book explains why the author thinks that’s mistaken. He reaches this negative conclusion by contending that the major arguments for veganism fail: they don’t establish the right sort of connection between producing and eating animal-based foods. Moreover, if they didn’t have this problem, then they would have other ones: we wouldn’t be obliged to abstain from all animal products, but to eat strange things instead—e.g., roadkill, insects, and things left in dumpsters. On his view, although we have a collective obligation not to farm animals, there is no specific diet that most individuals ought to have. Nevertheless, he does think that some people are obligated to be vegans, but that’s because they’ve joined a movement, or formed a practical identity, that requires that sacrifice. This book argues that there are good reasons to make such a move, albeit not ones strong enough to show that everyone must do likewise.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
Buy this book $140.91 new (12% off)   Amazon page
ISBN(s) 0367230046   1032089741
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 59,968
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Consequentialism and Nonhuman Animals.Tyler John & Jeff Sebo - forthcoming - In Douglas W. Portmore (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Consequentialism. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 564-591.
Veganism, Moral Motivation and False Consciousness.Susana Pickett - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (3):1-21.
The Freegan Challenge to Veganism.Bob Fischer & Josh Milburn - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (3):1-19.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

The Moral Footprint of Animal Products.Krzysztof Saja - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (2):193–202.
Ethical Veganism, Virtue, and Greatness of the Soul.Carlo Alvaro - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (6):765-781.
In Defense of Eating Vegan.Stijn Bruers - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (4):705-717.
Is It Wrong to Eat Animals?Loren Lomasky - 2013 - Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):177-200.
You Can't Buy Your Way Out of Veganism.Bob Fischer - 2016 - Between the Species 19 (1).
The Mere Considerability of Animals.Mylan Engel Jr - 2001 - Acta Analytica 16:89-108.
Dürfen wir Tiere essen?Jens Tuider - 2013 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 88 (1):269-280.
Raw Veganism: The Philosophy of the Human Diet.Carlo Alvaro - forthcoming - Routledge Studies in Food, Society and the Environment.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2020-06-10

Total views
38 ( #275,606 of 2,433,318 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
9 ( #74,003 of 2,433,318 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes