Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2008)

Authors
Melvin Fitting
CUNY Graduate Center
Abstract
There is an obvious difference between what a term designates and what it means. At least it is obvious that there is a difference. In some way, meaning determines designation, but is not synonymous with it. After all, “the morning star” and “the evening star” both designate the planet Venus, but don't have the same meaning. Intensional logic attempts to study both designation and meaning and investigate the relationships between them
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References found in this work BETA

Meaning and Necessity.Rudolf Carnap - 1947 - University of Chicago Press.
On Denoting.Bertrand Russell - 1905 - Mind 14 (56):479-493.
The Frege Reader.Gottlob Frege & Michael Beaney (eds.) - 1997 - Blackwell.
Über Sinn Und Bedeutung.G. Frege - 1892 - Philosophical Review 1:574.

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Citations of this work BETA

The Logic of Justification.Sergei Artemov - 2008 - Review of Symbolic Logic 1 (4):477-513.
BH-CIFOL: Case-Intensional First Order Logic.Nuel Belnap & Thomas Müller - 2013 - Journal of Philosophical Logic (2-3):1-32.

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