Education and Culture 22 (1):35-54 (2006)

Abstract
: This article argues that conceptions of community after Dewey despair of an institutional means of recovering individuality, which is the central problem of democracy. They so despair, I contend, because of their politicized view of the individual. I first briefly consider the contrast between Dewey and contemporary proceduralists and civic republicans, before turning to my central discussion: C. Wright Mills, whose critique indicates a historical watershed for Dewey's view of community. Ultimately, despair of a Deweyan sense of community issues in a contemporary stalemate between what I identify as the political "activist" and "apathist."
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DOI 10.1353/eac.2006.0004
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References found in this work BETA

Anarchy, State, and Utopia.Robert Nozick - 1974 - Philosophy 52 (199):102-105.
The Sociological Imagination.C. Wright Mills - 1960 - British Journal of Educational Studies 9 (1):75-76.

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The Reader and the Redeemer.Callum Ingram - 2015 - Contemporary Pragmatism 12 (2):232-250.

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