Deriving the Manifestly Qualitative World from a Pure-Power Base: Light-like Networks

Philosophia Scientiae 15 (3):155-175 (2011)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Seeking to derive the manifestly qualitative world of objects and entities without recourse to fundamental categoricity or qualitativity, I offer an account of how higher-order categorical properties and objects may emerge from a pure-power base. I explore the possibility of ‘fields’ whose fluctuations are force-carrying entities, differentiated with respect to a micro-topology of curled-up spatial dimensions. Since the spacetime paths of gauge bosons have zero ‘spacetime interval’ and no time-like extension, I argue that according them the status of fundamental entities would support a pure-power ontology. Such entities, circulating within self-sustaining micro-topological ‘networks’, feasibly maintain definite spatial configurations of conserved physical quantities, including energy-momentum. Perceived as time-like and massy, and representing fermionic entities, they give rise to the manifest world.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,953

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Analytics

Added to PP
2012-07-03

Downloads
256 (#82,104)

6 months
38 (#100,469)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Sharon Ford
University of Queensland

Citations of this work

No citations found.

Add more citations

References found in this work

Against quidditism.Robert Black - 2000 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (1):87 – 104.
Symmetry in intertheory relations.M. L. G. Redhead - 1975 - Synthese 32 (1-2):77 - 112.
Einstein and the Kaluza–Klein particle.Jeroen van Dongen - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (2):185-210.
Einstein and the Kaluza–Klein particle.Jeroen van Dongen - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (2):185-210.

Add more references