Judging the morality of business practices: The influence of personal moral philosophies [Book Review]

Journal of Business Ethics 11 (5-6):461 - 470 (1992)
Abstract
Individuals'' moral judgments of certain business practices and their decisions to engage in those practices are influenced by their personal moral philosophies: (a) situationists advocate striving for the best consequences possible irrespective of moral maxims; (b) subjectivists reject moral guidelines and base judgments on personal values and practical concerns; (c) absolutists assume that actions are moral, provided they yield positive consequences and conform to moral rules; (d) exceptionists prefer to follow moral dictates but allow for exceptions for practical reasons. These variations, which are based on two fundamental dimensions (concern for principles and concern for promoting human welfare) influence a variety of moral processes and have implications for ethical debates over business practices.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1007/BF00870557
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
Edit this record
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Mark as duplicate
Request removal from index
Revision history
Download options
Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 30,727
Through your library
References found in this work BETA
An Empirical Study of Moral Reasoning Among Managers.Robbin Derry - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (11):855 - 862.
Situation Ethics: The New Morality.Joseph F. Fletcher - 1966 - Westminster John Knox Press.

View all 8 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

View all 104 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total downloads
66 ( #82,554 of 2,197,331 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
3 ( #97,207 of 2,197,331 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Monthly downloads
My notes
Sign in to use this feature